Read the BBC article on why many women are reluctant to cycle?

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  • Read the BBC article on why many women are reluctant to cycle?
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    Rob Hilton
    Member

    Is the answer because the public at large are pricks?

    PeterPoddy
    Member

    Spot on? It never reaches any conclusions, it’s just a series of experiences and opinions.

    Premier Icon Poopscoop
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    Safety.
    Sexist abuse.
    Etc
    etc

    Conclusions I would say? 🙂

    mikey74
    Member

    This seems to be an article less about cycling, and more about the nature of modern-day Britain i.e. Full of dicks. However, much of what the story mentions could be applied to both sexes: For example, I’ve had my arse slapped by a passing motorist. I’ve had “witty” comments aimed at me whilst cycling, and running, for that matter.

    I’m not saying their comments aren’t legitimate, just that the article seems rather blinkered.

    Premier Icon boriselbrus
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    Depressing reading. But the bit where she says a bloke said “keep pedalling, nearly there” and she found it patronising? I’ve had it said to me and I’ve said it to other blokes. I guess there is a difference between intention and perception.

    Premier Icon Esme
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    I shall try to remember all this advice:

    Don’t boast of your long rides
    Don’t cultivate a “bicycle face”
    Don’t refuse assistance up a hill
    Don’t use bicycle slang. Leave that to the boys
    Don’t go out after dark without a male escort
    Don’t scratch a match on the seat of your bloomers
    Don’t appear in public until you have learned to ride well
    Don’t appear to be up on “records” and “record smashing”

    . . . even though it’s from 1895

    Premier Icon Poopscoop
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    Yeah, 1895 was a good year for women’s cycling.Lol

    That was a quote from an American author.

    I bet the UK was even more repressed about women on bikes! Lol

    wiggles
    Member

    Don’t go out after dark without a male escort

    That could get expensive this time of year

    Premier Icon tomhoward
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    “I’ve even had ‘keep pedalling, nearly there’ – from a male cyclist. They wouldn’t have said it to another man, it’s so patronising and uncalled for.

    As someone who enters races well beyond his fitness level, blokes definitely say it to other blokes…

    Premier Icon cinnamon_girl
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    Is it OK to say that I cringe when I read rubbish like that? Sometimes women just need to WTFU and ignore stupid words shouted by stupid males.

    Was talking to my daughter at the weekend, she won’t go running without a friend. WTF? And this, motivation, I think is a large part of the problem with women. I told her to join my old running club, that went down well!

    *shakes fluffy little head*

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    Spot on? Not really.

    1) “The roads aren’t safe” – not true, most of them are. Just avoid the bad ones, it’s not usually difficult.

    2) “Keep pedalling, nearly there” – she suggests that wouldn’t happen to a man – well, it does. All the sodding time. Along with any number of other stupid comments. Not usually sexual harassment though.

    It’s not that the public are all pricks either. I might get comments from a few dozen cars a year, depending on when I ride. But I’ve been passed by countless thousands.

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    cinnamon_girl – Member
    Is it OK to say that I cringe when I read rubbish like that?

    No, that’s not alright, it’s sexist! 😉

    Premier Icon cinnamon_girl
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    Excuses excuses. It’s tiresome.

    Edit: just to say that I’ve had some flippin’ good times on my bike as well as running and walking all over the place and I’ve survived… for 25 years and the majority of the time on my own.

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    cinnamon_girl – Member
    Excuses excuses. It’s tiresome.

    The women in the article you mean?

    Rob Hilton
    Member

    It’s not that the public are all pricks either. I might get comments from a few dozen cars a year, depending on when I ride. But I’ve been passed by countless thousands.

    Absolute proof that there aren’t a load of pricks out there

    Premier Icon cinnamon_girl
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    Yes. I think I’d be good as a motivational speaker. 😆

    mikey74
    Member

    2) “Keep pedalling, nearly there” – she suggests that wouldn’t happen to a man – well, it does. All the sodding time. Along with any number of other stupid comments. Not usually sexual harassment though.

    Yeah, that thought crossed my mind, too. Yes, people can be dicks, but some women need to stop being so sensitive. Just get out there and do it. Prove the idiots wrong.**

    **Note: I am not legitimising sexism, just saying that not everything is intended as sexism. Even if it was, why should it stop you from doing something you enjoy doing? Plus, where would women be today if the likes of Emmeline Pankhurst were deterred by what people said.

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    cinnamon_girl – Member
    Yes. I think I’d be good as a motivational speaker.

    There is someone I wish you could motivate to ride but it’s not a woman! Lol

    Premier Icon scotroutes
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    mikey74 wrote:

    2) “Keep pedalling, nearly there” – she suggests that wouldn’t happen to a man – well, it does. All the sodding time. Along with any number of other stupid comments. Not usually sexual harassment though

    .

    Yeah, that thought crossed my mind, too. Yes, people can be dicks, but some women need to stop being so sensitive. Just get out there and do it. Prove the idiots wrong.**
    **Note: I am not legitimising sexism, just saying that not everything is intended as sexism. Even if it was, why should it stop you from doing something you enjoy doing? Plus, where would women be today if the likes of Emmeline Pankhurst were deterred by what people said.
    [/quote]
    Mikey – sounds like that might be a mans name. A number of folk will be along any minute now to inform you that you have no right to comment on account of you having a penis.

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    Yes, people can be dicks, but some women need to stop being so sensitive.

    I’m not going that far. It’s much easier to shrug off when you’re a reasonable sized bloke than when you’re a woman. Just pointing out that whilst the impact of this stuff is different for women, the actions of the **** in cars are common to both.

    I don’t like the article though. I wouldn’t be surprised if it put even more women off or dented a lot of confidences.

    Premier Icon cinnamon_girl
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    Stop trolling scotroutes!

    Premier Icon cinnamon_girl
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    I wouldn’t be surprised if it put even more women off or dented a lot of confidences.

    Spot on mol.

    wiggles
    Member

    I get told “nearly there” or “keep going mate” all the time…

    Im not a woman just a fat bastard that looks like he is going to keel over at any second 😆

    mikey74
    Member

    Mikey – sounds like that might be a mans name. A number of folk will be along any minute now to inform you that you have no right to comment on account of you having a penis.

    It is indeed. You may be correct, but I stand by my right to express an opinion, penis n’all.

    I don’t like the article though. I wouldn’t be surprised if it put even more women off or dented a lot of confidences.

    Agreed!

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    wiggles

    Im not a woman just a fat bastard that looks like he is going to keel over at any second

    You just described me. 😀

    Premier Icon cinnamon_girl
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    There is someone I wish you could motivate to ride but it’s not a woman! Lol

    Shall I try?

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    cinnamon_girl – Member
    There is someone I wish you could motivate to ride but it’s not a woman! Lol
    Shall I try?

    Nah, have to finish eating this kebab at the mo. 😉

    tjagain
    Member

    first thing I saw was all the pics of women cyclists are in lycra and helmets. thats enough to put many non enthusiast cyclists off.

    Premier Icon Esme
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    “all the pics of women cyclists are in lycra and helmets”

    Scroll down a bit further, tj – there are some very fetching straw boaters.

    squirrelking
    Member

    Starts off crap and I think puts you in a frame of mind for the rest of the article. As said men totally get that flung at them as well.

    That said the later stuff is about right, my missus feels more comfortable in female groups, more as an attitude thing than a problem with guys, she’ll be getting some Air Maiden sessions this year.

    Comment on the roads being dangerous is fair enough. It’s all well and good saying “avoid the bad ones” but when they are all bad what do you do then? I can think of two quiet roads out of my town, one has a six mile uphill (which is utterly crap if you’re just starting) with an sharp dive back to sea level over a few miles at the end and the other takes you back onto the main road. Neither are exactly confidence building in terms of either stepping up to main raods (the choice is single track or trunk road) or fitness.

    The article’s trite nonsense.

    “Sometimes, when I’ve been out cycling on my own, I’ve had male drivers shout at me as they’re overtaking,” said the 45-year-old British Cycling Breeze Champion. “I’ve been told to ‘read the Highway Code’ and ‘get off the road’. I’ve also been sworn at. “I’ve even had ‘keep pedalling, nearly there’ – from a male cyclist. They wouldn’t have said it to another man, it’s so patronising and uncalled for.

    “All I want to do is ride my bike and I don’t think I should have to put up with abuse from other – mainly male – road users, just because I’m a woman.”

    I’ve had all those comments. It has nothing to do with her being a woman. She has a chip on her shoulder and is divisive.

    “Women tend to be more concerned about safety than men,” said Ms Pidd. “And those fears are perfectly rational. Roads aren’t safe for cyclists – you need to be confident to go on the roads.”

    I read last year that aircon is sexist. Are roads sexist too?

    “sometimes it’s really mean. Stuff like ‘thunder thighs’.”

    or MAMIL? I wonder why there’s no MAWIL in common parlance.

    Other comments about new groups being cliquey or riders being put off because they weren’t good at sports at school or are worried about their base fitness aren’t only applicable to women either. They’re possibly more applicable to men who tend to be more competitive and more worried about underperformance, IMO.

    Of course if women want to organise exclusive events then good for them. I hope they’re not the same ones complaining about the lack of a womens category at an enduro event though.

    However, if issues are to be taken seriously they shouldn’t be obfuscated. The only one mentioned here is the woman being slapped on the arse by a motorbike rider.

    TheBrick
    Member

    The roads aren’t safe” – not true, most of them are. Just avoid the bad ones, it’s not usually difficult.

    All very well for social rides but if it is for utility that doesn’t help if it’s where you need to get to is down a non safe road. There may be a alternative route but they are frequently much longer one.

    geetee1972
    Member

    The reasons cited are the exact same reasons that more men don’t cycle, it’s just that it affects women more and so puts more women off.

    The key issue is risk. If cycling is perceived as risky then more risk averse people will be put off. Testosterone makes you less risk averse, which is why you see lower female participation in risky sports. It’s not a difficult thing to understand.

    The level of sexism in cycling is also a big problem for men. The whole MAMIL campaign is an awful attack on gender as well as age. Imagine if we started publishing articles on how ridiculous some women look in their yoga pants in the national press.

    I used to get no end of derrogotary and harrassing comments from the women in my office when I used to cycle in and out. It genuinely felt horrible each time I came to leave. I even got sent the following image by email from one of the women just before I got up to change:

    Again, I think the reason it doesn’t put more men off than it might otherwise do is that men are typically far less agreeable than women (i.e. they score lower on the trait agreeableness) and so it bothers them less. It bothered me for example but only a little and not enough to put me off.

    zokes
    Member

    However, if issues are to be taken seriously they shouldn’t be obfuscated. The only one mentioned here is the woman being slapped on the arse by a motorbike rider.

    Yup, agree. Afraid most of that article is complete twaddle, with the exception of this case of sexual assault, which got lost in what comes across as mostly very sensitive whining. I’ve had all the above (except the sexual assault) in the four months I’ve been riding on the road seriously, having spent the previous 20 years leading a mainly MTB cycling existence.

    And:

    The roads aren’t safe

    Well, this is hardly a phenomenon that affects only women. Again, serious issue lost in the noise.

    TheBrick
    Member

    Well, this is hardly a phenomenon that affects only women

    Of course not, but it can effect women proportionally more. This is the case with most of the points in the article. Of course many of the issues may not effect individual women, but it on mass, on aggregate proportionally more etc that is the important point that seems to be missed.

    vickypea
    Member

    I wasn’t overly convinced by the article. All of the stuff mentioned applies to men too. I’ve experienced idiots shouting out of the window of a passing car when I’ve been riding alone or with a group of men. The behaviour of some motorists scares me sometimes but again, female motorists can be to blame as well, including the one who deliberately swerved at me and mr Pea.

    zokes
    Member

    Of course not, but it can effect women proportionally more.

    How? Are men more resistant to the risks of car doors or articulated lorries?

    geetee1972
    Member

    Of course not, but it can effect women proportionally more.

    This is exactly true but that’s not neccessarily a reflection that the behaviour shown to women is different to men, just that they react differently to it and that’s most likely to product of relative testosterone levels.

    Indeed, there is research that shows drivers are more careful around female cyclists. I can’t find it but there was some research done a few years ago by a bloke who documented his experiences of close passes while wearing a long haired wig.

    How? Are men more resistant to the risks of car doors or articulated lorries?

    Well this is the effect of testosterone; men just don’t perceive the risks in the same way.

    vickypea
    Member

    Are you suggesting that I have high levels of testosterone? :p

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